Montessori Philosophy

Maria Montessori was an Italian physician, researcher, educator, and noted humanitarian who is best known for the philosophy of education that bears her name. Her beautiful philosophy, methods, and materials are in use today in public and private schools throughout the world.

maria.jpg

Dr. Montessori began her work with children when she accepted a clinic for 'deficient, insane, retarded and unfortunate children.' Through her observations, compassion, intelligence, and hard work, she developed methods and materials to help these children learn.

 

To everyone's amazement, 'her' children were so successful that they could pass examinations given to 'normal' children. It bothered Dr. Montessori that "these normal children in ordinary schools were equaled in intelligence by her ill students," and she pursued in-depth research about how young children learn. She concluded that a teacher should direct, guide, and help children learn with an attitude of love and acceptance. True mental work is not exhausting but rather energizing and joyful. All children are born with potential, and it is the adult's job to create an environment to stimulate children to work towards their potential independently.

Dr. Montessori started the "Casa dei Bambini" or Children's House, in 1907. The fame of her methods and successes quickly spread. People came from all over the world to observe at the Children's House, and visitors were astonished by what the children could do. Dr. Montessori wrote many books, and she traveled extensively to train others in her philosophy.

In a Montessori classroom, The Teacher, The Classroom, and The Child create a 'Learning Triangle.'

The Teacher

Teachers prepare the classroom environment, present lessons, observe and guide them as they develop and practice new skills. Children choose the work that interests them, and the teachers circulate quietly and offer support or give lessons to individual children or small groups. They interject only when learning is blocked or when a child is ready for a new challenge.

 

Teachers treat children respectfully. They regard the children as competent learners who are fully capable of taking charge of their own learning. They encourage independence and freedom within limits. Through objective observations and positive relationship-building, they learn each child's strengths, weaknesses, interests, and needs.

The Classroom

The Montessori classroom includes a larger age range than in a typical early learning environment. This allows the children to learn various skills at their own pace. Older children can develop leadership skills by modeling for, mentoring, and teaching the younger children.

Through their work, children develop concentration, motivation, persistence, and discipline. The children make choices and use what the environment offers to support growth, development, and sequential, meaningful learning. They progress at their own rhythm. They develop concentration, motivation, persistence, discipline, and the joy of learning.

The Child

The Montessori classroom includes a larger age range than in a typical early learning environment. This allows the children to learn various skills at their own pace. Older children have the opportunity to develop leadership skills by modeling for, mentoring and teaching the younger children.

Through their work, children develop concentration, motivation, persistence, and discipline. The children make choices and use what the environment offers to support growth, development and sequential, meaningful learning. They progress at their own rhythm. They develop concentration, motivation, persistence, discipline, and the joy of learning.

"The greatest sign of success for a teacher... is to be able to say: The children are now working as if I did not exist." 

                                                                                                            - Maria Montessori

gma.png

Join our mailing list and never miss an update from the school.